Monthly Archives: June 2015

DDOD Love from Health Datapalooza 2015

Health Datapalooza

Demand-Driven Open Data (DDOD) has gotten a lot of coverage throughout Health Datapalooza 2015.  I participated in 4 panels throughout the week and had the opportunity to explain DDOD to many constituents.

  • Developer HealthCa.mp
    Health DevCamp logo
    Developer HealthCa.mp is a collaborative event for learning about existing and emerging APIs that can be used to develop applications that will help consumers, patients and/or beneficiaries achieve better care through access to health data, especially their own!Areas of focus include:
    • Prototype BlueButton on FHIR API from CMS
    • Project Argonaut
    • Privacy on FHIR initiative
    • Sources of population data from CMS and elsewhere around HHS
  • Health Datapalooza DataLab
    EVENT DETAILS HHS has so much data! Medicare, substance abuse and mental health, social services and disease prevention are only some of the MANY topical domains where HHS provides huge amounts of free data for public consumption. It’s all there on HealthData.gov! Don’t know how the data might be useful for you? In the DataLab you’ll meet the people who collect and curate this trove of data assets as they serve up their data for your use. But if you still want inspiration, many of the data owners will co-present with creative, insightful, innovative users of their data to truly demonstrate its alternative value for positive disruptions in health, health care, and social services.

    Moderator: Damon Davis, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

    Panelists: Natasha Alexeeva, Caretalia; Christina Bethell, PhD, MBA, MPH, Johns Hopkins; Lily Chen, PhD, National Center for Health Statistics; Steve Cohen, Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality; Manuel Figallo, Sas; Reem Ghandour, DrPH, MPA, Maternal and Child Health Bureau; Jennifer King, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services; Jennie Larkin, PhD, National Institutes of Health; Brooklyn Lupari, Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration; Rick Moser, PhD, National Cancer Institute; David Portnoy, MBA, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services; Chris Powers, PharmD, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services; Elizabeth Young, RowdMap

  • No, You Can’t Always Get What You Want: Getting What You Need from HHS
    EVENT DETAILSWhile more data is better than less, pushing out any ol’ data isn’t good enough.  As the Data Liberation movement matures, the folks releasing the data face a major challenge in determining what’s the most valuable stuff to put out.  How do they move from smorgasbord to intentionally curated data releases prioritizing the highest-value data?  Folks at HHS are wrestling with this, going out of their way to make sure they understand what you want and ensure you get the yummy data goodies you’re craving.  Learn how HHS is using your requests and feedback to share data differently.  This session explores the HHS new initiative, the Demand-Driven Open Data (DDOD): the lean startup approach to public-private collaboration.  A new initiative out of HHS IDEA Lab, DDOD is bold and ambitious, intending to change the fundamental data sharing mindset throughout HHS agencies — from quantity of datasets published to actual value delivered.

    Moderator: Damon Davis, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

    Panelists: Phil Bourne, National Institute of Health (NIH); Niall Brennan, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Jim Craver, MMA, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention; Chris Dymek, EdD, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services; Taha Kass-Hout, Food & Drug Administration; Brian Lee, MPH, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention; David Portnoy, MBA, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

  • Healthcare Entrepreneurs Boot Camp: Matching Public Health Data with Real-World Business Models
    EVENT DETAILSIf you’ve ever considered starting something using health data, whether a product, service, or offering in an existing business, or a start-up company to take over the world this is something you won’t want to miss.  In this highly-interactive, games-based brew-ha, we pack the room full of flat-out gurus to get an understanding of what it takes to be a healthcare entrepreneur.  Your guides will come from finance and investment; clinical research and medical management; sales and marketing; technology and information services; operations and strategy; analytics and data science; government and policy; business, product, and line owners from payers and providers; and some successful entrepreneurs who have been there and done it for good measure.  We’ll take your idea from the back of a napkin and give you the know-how to make it a reality!

    Orchestrators: Sujata Bhatia, MD, PhD, Harvard University; Niall Brennan, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Joshua Rosenthal, PhD, RowdMap; Marshall Votta, Leverage Health Solutions

    Panelists: Michael Abate, JD, Dinsmore & Shohl LLP; Stephen Agular, Zaffre Investments; Chris Boone, PhD, Health Data Consortium; Craig Brammer, The Health Collaborative; John Burich, Passport Health Plan; Jim Chase, MHA, Minnesota Community Measurement; Arnaub Chatterjee, Merck; Henriette Coetzer, MD, RowdMap; Jim Craver, MAA, Center for Disease Control; Michelle De Mooy, Center for Democracy and Technology; Gregory Downing, PhD, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services; Chris Dugan, Evolent Health; Margo Edmunds,PhD, AcademyHealth; Douglas Fridsma, MD, PhD, American Medical Informatics Association; Tina Grande, MHS, Healthcare Leadership Council; Mina Hsiang, US Digital Services; Jessica Kahn, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Brian Lee, MPH, Center for Disease Control; David Portnoy, MBA, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services; Aaron Seib, National Association for Trusted Exchange; Maksim Tsvetovat, OpenHealth; David Wennberg, MD, The Dartmouth Institute; Niam Yaraghi, PhD, Brookings Institute; Jean-Ezra Yeung, Ayasdi

 

There were follow-up publications as well.  Among them, was HHS on a mission to liberate health data from GCN.

GCN article on DDOD
HHS found that its data owners were releasing datasets that were easy to generate and least risky to release, without much regard to what data consumers could really use. The DDOD framework lets HHS prioritize data releases based on the data’s value because, as every request is considered a use case.It lets users — be they researchers, nonprofits or local governments — request data in a systematic, ongoing and transparent way and ensures there will be data consumers for information that’s released, providing immediate, quantifiable value to both the consumer and HHS.

My list of speaking engagements at Palooza is here.